URBAN-15

URBAN-15’s Carnaval de los Muertos

“It is not macabre, it is not horror, it is not Friday the 13th or anything like that.”

– George Cisneros, URBAN-15

diadelosmuertosbanner

Imagine a moving altar of Muerto characters wearing vivid masks, large sugar calaveras heads and flowers–but dancing down the street. Every November 1st and 2nd, URBAN-15’s Carnaval de San Anto transforms into Carnaval de los Muertos for a very special performance in honor of All Saints Day and All Souls Day. This annual performance ritual is a combination of traditional Mexican culture and URBAN-15’s Brazilian and Portugese dance and rhythms, resulting in a presentation that pays tribute to our passed loved ones.

Carnaval de los Muertos has been an annual URBAN-15 tradition since the early 1990s, when the ensemble would make visits to the Alamo Camposanto, San Fernando Cathedral, Main Plaza and San Fernando Cemeteries. In recent years, URBAN-15 has performed in Hemisfair’s Plaza México, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, the Instituto Cultural de México, and appeared for presentations at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, Market Square, Centro Cultural Aztlan, and the Rinconcito de Esperanza.

Carnaval de los Muertos is an organic altar with special costumes, choreography, and rhythms all designed and created by the URBAN-15 members themselves. We invite you to participate in this community tradition with us at one (or more!) of this year’s performances:

Friday, November 1st at 7pm: Elmendorf Lake Park (3700 W. Commerce 78207). FREE

Saturday, November 2nd at 6:45pm: Market Square (514 W. Commerce 78207). FREE

Saturday, November 2nd at 8:30pm: La Villita (418 Villita St 78205). FREE

Stay posted for more dates, times, and locations! In the meantime, check out a previous performance at Centro Cultural:

The Politics of Ink: Political Advertising in a Pre-Digital Epoch

Click below to watch the archived episode!

On the eve of Election Day, November’s episode of Hidden Histories delves into the archives of Ruben Munguia, exploring the role of print shops and print culture in electoral politics. From the early days of La Estrellita Printing Shop on Sunders Street, the Munguia family played an integral role in the emergence of political power on San Antonio’s West and Southsides. Whether printing picket signs for striking cigar workers and pecan shellers or palm cards for candidates running for school boards and city council, Munguia Printers provided low-cost and often donated content, design, and production services to local candidates and campaigns.

The willingness of citizens to come forth as candidates for public office is critical to the strength of democracy, yet history books and newspaper archives mainly document the winners and losers in the most visible elected contests. Seldom do we remember the names and faces of the thousands of people who annually run for offices that critically impact the community―as school and water board members, constables, justices of the peace, party officers, and others―yet remain beyond the horizon of public attention. It is in tribute to these candidates, both winners and losers, that the Munguia collection of photographs and campaign collateral becomes particularly significant. Guest commentators include Eddie Coy Ybarra, former co-owner of Munguia Printers, and Dr. Henry Flores, Distinguished University Research Professor Emeritus at St. Mary’s University.

Originally a part of the city’s Tricentennial arts activities, Hidden Histories is a monthly, magazine-format video series that pursues and preserves the stories, lives, and places that make San Antonio and surrounding regions an inspiring cultural treasure. Now in its second season, Hidden Histories continues to premiere monthly screenings live in our studio, free of charge. Each screening uncovers important cultural histories of the region by featuring archival interviews with community leaders; significant performances by musicians, dancers and poets; interactions with working artists; lost documentaries; forgotten narrative films; and vintage discussions of important community issues.

All episodes can be viewed for free either live at URBAN-15 studio (2500 S. Presa 78210) or online at https://urban15.org/live-stream/

After each live screening, all episodes are archived online for 24/7 access at http://hiddenhistories.tv/archives

For more information on the series, visit http://hiddenhistories.tv

 

Josiah Media Festival Tickets Available NOW!

October 17th, 18th, &19th @ 7:00 pm

All Screenings @ The URBAN-15 Group
2500 S. Presa, San Antonio, TX, 78210


BUY YOUR TICKETS HERE TODAY!


Mark Your Calendar

In 2019, the Josiah Media Festival celebrates its 13th consecutive year as one of the world’s longest-running film festivals exclusively for young filmmakers 21 years old and under. Each year, this festival has received increased international attention and participation. During the 2019 call for entries, we received over 2,000 films, adjudicated 254 entries, and selected 12 winners from around the world!

This year’s Josiah Media Festival will take place at the URBAN-15 Studio in San Antonio from Thursday, October 17th through Saturday, October 19th. Over the course of the three-day festival, we will screen the best 50 films from four categories (narrative, documentary, animation, and experimental.) The festival also includes a special Saturday matinee screening that will feature all of the selected films made by young San Antonio filmmakers attending Communication Arts High School, Film School of San Antonio at Harlandale High School, John Marshall High School, Northeast School of the Arts, Say Si, and Saint Mary’s Hall.

Screening Schedule

  • Thursday, October 17 at 7pm
  • Friday, October 18 at 7pm
  • Saturday, October 19 at 2pm (highlighting young San Antonio filmmakers)
  • Saturday, October 19 at 7pm (12 winning films followed by award ceremony and Skype conversations with winners from around the world)

When Marcus and Nancy Neundorf met with URBAN-15 directors in 2007, no one could have envisioned that a memorial screening of films by their recently deceased son, Josiah Neundorf—a talented young media artist from San Antonio, Texas, USA who succumbed to bone cancer in 2006—would evolve into an internationally-recognized film festival. Since its founding, young filmmakers participating in the Josiah Media Festival have gone on to receive acclaim at other film festivals worldwide; garner attention from national and international media; excel at schools such as Tisch, USC, AFI, Chapman, Columbia and Ringling; and begin thriving professional careers.

Tickets are $10 per screening or $30 festival package. Tickets can be purchased in advance at here.
For more information: josiahfestival@urban15.org | (210) 736-1500 | www.josiahmediafestival.com

From Climate Thunder to Climate Strike: Unearthing Environmental Resistance in South Texas

Click below to view archived episode!

Screen Shot 2019-10-28 at 11.24.04 AM

On the heels of the Global Climate Strike, October’s episode of Hidden Histories tells the story of highly visible environmental struggles in South Texas around energy, water, and development through a novel lens—as early precursors of today’s climate activism. Curated by Greg Harman, Sierra Club organizer and Co-Editor of Deceleration, “Climate Thunder” explores COPS campaigns against CPS rate hikes in the 1970s; monkeywrenching activities to halt Northside clearcutting; and the fight against the Eastside’s “Dirty Deely” coal plant and the South Texas Nuclear Project on the Gulf Coast. Guests include Diana Lopez, director of Southwest Workers Union; T.C. Calvert, President of Neighborhoods First Alliance; Russell Seal of the Sierra Club; and UTSA professor Kenneth Walker, whose current research reimagines San Antonio’s historical struggles for equitable allocation of resources in response to extreme weather events through the lens of climate justice.

Also included in this month’s episode, representatives from the San Antonio Public Library and the Library Foundation will discuss efforts to expand SAPL’s Texana/Genealogy Department to include archives on the early Latino families of San Antonio.

Originally a part of the city’s Tricentennial arts activities, Hidden Histories is a monthly, magazine-format video series that pursues and preserves the stories, lives, and places that make San Antonio and surrounding regions an inspiring cultural treasure. Now in its second season, Hidden Histories continues to premiere monthly screenings live in our studio, free of charge. Each screening uncovers important cultural histories of the region by featuring archival interviews with community leaders; significant performances by musicians, dancers and poets; interactions with working artists; lost documentaries; forgotten narrative films; and vintage discussions of important community issues.

All episodes can be viewed for free either live at URBAN-15 studio (2500 S. Presa 78210) or online at https://urban15.org/live-stream/

After each live screening, all episodes are archived online for 24/7 access at http://hiddenhistories.tv/archives

For more information on the series, visit http://hiddenhistories.tv

 

URBAN-15’s Holiday Laser Show

Looking for info on how to reserve tickets to our FREE public performance of the 2019 Holiday Laser Show? CLICK HERE!

Looking for info on student concerts and how to reserve tickets for your school or community center? Read on:

2019 marks the 16th annual Holiday Laser Show, a high impact STEAMM (science, technology, engineering, art, math, and music) spectacular which features choreographed laser beams, animation and light effects performed to holiday music favorites.

On September 3, 2019, The URBAN-15 Group will begin accepting reservations from K-12 schools throughout Bexar County, as well as youth and special needs-serving non-profits, for our four free student showings of the 2019 Holiday Laser Show.

All shows take place at the beautiful Edgewood Theatre of Performing Arts
(402 Lance St, San Antonio, TX 78237) on the following days/times:

  • Monday, December 2nd at 9:00am – All Bexar County
  • Monday, December 2nd at 10:30am- All Bexar County – SOLD OUT!
  • Monday, December 2nd at 12pm- All Bexar County – SOLD OUT!
  • Tuesday, December 3rd at 9:00am – Edgewood ISD only
  • Tuesday, December 3rd at 10:30am – All Bexar County – SOLD OUT!
  • Tuesday, December 3rd at 12pm- All Bexar County – SOLD OUT!

Admission to student shows is free, but all schools will need to arrange their
own transportation.

To reserve a spot for your school, call URBAN-15 Studio at 210-736-1500 or email events@urban15.org with the following information:

  • School name, address, and phone number
  • Principal’s name and email
  • Point of contact’s name, email, and direct (not school) phone number
  • Date & time desired
  • Number of attendees (students + teachers + any parent volunteers).

Schools can reserve up to 150 tickets, with additional tickets possible with confirmation of transportation after October 14th.
Reservations will be taken Tuesday, Sept 3 – Fri, Nov 1, 2019.

While the Holiday Laser Show presents an entertaining array of light, color, and sound, there are also numerous scientific and mathematical principles involved in creating this spectacle. For schools interested in supplemental materials that highlight links between science, math, and the arts via concepts such as refraction, reflection, angles, symmetry, magnification, and others, CLICK HERE.  Many schools have also used the show as an incentive for attendance.

The Holiday Laser Show is a collaborative work of laser artist Tim Walsh and composer George Cisneros, who have worked together on projects all around the United States, including Cincinnati, New Orleans, Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston, Waco and Austin. Other notable presentations include the opening ceremonies of the Texas Sesquicentennial in 1986 at the State Capitol; the World Empathy Conference in Guadalajara, Mexico; and the 2008-2012 LUMINARIA celebrations in San Antonio.


For more information please call our studio at (210) 736-1500 or email events@urban15.org.

For more information on laser artist Tim Walsh, please visit his website here.

Working Artists: A Labor Day Special

View archived episode below!

When we think of the “labor” in Labor Day, we imagine waiting tables, working construction or cleaning hotel rooms—seldom playing an instrument, writing, painting or dancing. As a result, we erase the unrecognized (and often unpaid) value of the labor artists perform, not to mention the working conditions many artists face in their day jobs. In honor of Labor Day, September’s episode of Hidden Histories seeks to recognize the “working artists” of San Antonio, asking: How do artists make a living? Exploring the wide range of lived responses to that question, we talk with musicians who gig and teach, poets who work at call centers, writers who teach online, pianists who play in bank lobbies, and trumpeters organizing for better pay and conditions as part of the local musicians’ union. Finally, reprising our homage to Studs Terkel’s Working, September’s episode also presents a new collection of short film interviews with a range of San Antonio residents on one question: What was your first job?

Originally a part of the city’s Tricentennial arts activities, Hidden Histories is a monthly, magazine-format video series that pursues and preserves the stories, lives, and places that make San Antonio and surrounding regions an inspiring cultural treasure. Now in its second season, Hidden Histories continues to premiere monthly screenings live in our studio, free of charge. Each screening uncovers important cultural histories of the region by featuring archival interviews with community leaders; significant performances by musicians, dancers and poets; interactions with working artists; lost documentaries; forgotten narrative films; and vintage discussions of important community issues.

All episodes can be viewed for free either live at URBAN-15 studio (2500 S. Presa 78210) or online at https://urban15.org/live-stream/

After each live screening, all episodes are archived online for 24/7 access at http://hiddenhistories.tv/archives

For more information on the series, visit http://hiddenhistories.tv

 

Congratulations to the 2019 Josiah Media Festival Winners!

In 2019, over 2,200 films were submitted to URBAN-15’s 13th annual Josiah Media Festival. 128 of these were eligible for judging by a panel of filmmakers and film critics, and out of these 128 films–hailing from 30 countries–the following 12 rose to the top in their genre categories. Congratulations to these young filmmakers and their crews!


ANIMATION

 

1st Place:

CATNAP
Alivia Horsley, 22
Belmont, CA, USA

 

 

2nd Place:

SHAMAN
Dicle Alemsah Firat, 21
Surrey, England, UK

 

 

3rd Place:

INTERPHASE
Kenny Tran, 21
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


DOCUMENTARY

 

1st Place:

UNDER THE SCARF
Women’s Voices Now, Ages 16-20
Rolling Hill Estates, CA, USA

 

2nd Place:

PEARL FRYAR: THE MAN
WITH A GREEN THUMB
Rachel Smith, 20
Rock Hill, SC, USA

 

 

3rd Place:

MORNING STAR
Abhijit Pastro, 19
Eskişehir, Turkey

 


EXPERIMENTAL

 

1st Place:

RAINLILLY
Rina Momose, 21
Otsu, Japan

 

 

2nd Place:

THE MAGIC SQUARE
Josh Cromwell, 23
Richmond, VA, USA

 

 

3rd Place:

WE BUILD OUR
OWN ZIGGURATS
Kyle Ryan, 20
Milwaukee, WI, USA

 


NARRATIVE

 

1st Place:

RESPONSIBILITY
Mehmet Ali Avei, 18
Hvidovre, Denmark

 

 

2nd:

BROTHERS IN SPACE
Alvilda Lyneborg Lassen, 18
Hvidovre, Denmark

 

 

3rd:

ECHO
Signe Buun Bugge, 20
Hvidovre, Denmark

 


The 2019 Josiah Media Festival took place Thursday, October 17th – Saturday, October 19th at the URBAN-15 Studio, located at 2500 S. Presa in San Antonio, TX. For more information on next year’s festival, contact us at (210) 736-1500 or josiahfestival@urban15.org.

Pan de Muerto, Pan de Vida

Click below to view the archived episode!

Screen Shot 2019-08-12 at 5.43.11 AM

From conchas to cuernitos, pan dulce—Mexican sweet bread—is a daily pleasure of San Antonio meetings and family gatherings. But how much do we really know about its deep cultural and historical roots, much less its thousands of varieties and names? In August’s episode of Hidden Histories, we speak with UTSA professor emerita Ellen Riojas Clark about her latest book project, which explores the cultural history of pan dulce, venturing into her kitchen to learn baking techniques from panadero Logan Iruegas and chatting with Patricia Bedoy, co-owner of Bedoy’s Bakery. Live studio audience will enjoy free samples!

Originally a part of the city’s Tricentennial arts activities, Hidden Histories is a monthly, magazine-format video series that pursues and preserves the stories, lives, and places that make San Antonio and surrounding regions an inspiring cultural treasure. Now in its second season, Hidden Histories continues to premiere monthly screenings live in our studio, free of charge. Each screening uncovers important cultural histories of the region by featuring archival interviews with community leaders; significant performances by musicians, dancers and poets; interactions with working artists; lost documentaries; forgotten narrative films; and vintage discussions of important community issues.

All episodes can be viewed for free either live at URBAN-15 studio (2500 S. Presa 78210) or online at https://urban15.org/live-stream/

After each live screening, all episodes are archived online for 24/7 access at http://hiddenhistories.tv/archives

For more information on the series, visit http://hiddenhistories.tv

 

Something’s in the Water: Origins of the Southside Sound

Click below to view archived episode:

San Antonio’s Southside, particularly its high schools, has long been a hotbed of musicianship in the city’s music scene. Though the Westside sound is more well known, this month’s episode investigates the roots and ripple effects of the Southside sound. Is it something in the water? Join us as we facilitate a dialogue between a veterano of the Southside scene–Ramon Hernandez, curator of the Hispanic Entertainment Archives–and two of this generation’s up-and-comers: electronic artist and vocalist Alyson Alonzo and Julio Lopez of critically acclaimed conjunto punk band Los de Esta Noche.

Originally a part of the city’s Tricentennial arts activities, Hidden Histories is a monthly, magazine-format video series that pursues and preserves the stories, lives, and places that make San Antonio and surrounding regions an inspiring cultural treasure. Now in its second season, Hidden Histories continues to premiere monthly screenings live in our studio, free of charge. Each screening uncovers important cultural histories of the region by featuring archival interviews with community leaders; significant performances by musicians, dancers and poets; interactions with working artists; lost documentaries; forgotten narrative films; and vintage discussions of important community issues.

All episodes can be viewed for free either live at URBAN-15 studio (2500 S. Presa 78210) or online at https://urban15.org/live-stream/

After each live screening, all episodes are archived online for 24/7 access at http://hiddenhistories.tv/archives

For more information on the series, visit http://hiddenhistories.tv

 

 

Priesthood of the People: Community Legacies of Vatican II

Click below to view the archived episode!

From 1962-1965, the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican—aka Vatican II—shook the world by convening Catholic clergy from all over the world to reflect on how the Church should interact with the forces of the modern world. In the following decades, this new openness would ripple outward to local parishes, including those here in San Antonio. According to Father David Garcia—Administrator of Mission Concepcion, Director of the Old Spanish Missions in San Antonio, and this month’s guest commentator—Vatican II created a “priesthood of the people” that led to masses in Spanish as well as English, celebrations of Guadalupe, and numerous organizations both inside and outside the church dedicated to new values of community engagement and social change. Ultimately, this shift in mindset within the Church would change the course of San Antonio political history, influencing the formation of numerous organizations such as Las Hermanas, PADRES, and COPS/Metro, which even today is on the forefront of local struggles for social justice and political representation. Sister Yolanda Tarango of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word provides additional commentary.

Joint Meeting of Las Hermanas and PADRES.

Originally a part of the city’s Tricentennial arts activities, Hidden Histories is a monthly, magazine-format video series that pursues and preserves the stories, lives, and places that make San Antonio and surrounding regions an inspiring cultural treasure. Now in its second season, Hidden Histories continues to premiere monthly screenings live in our studio, free of charge. Each screening uncovers important cultural histories of the region by featuring archival interviews with community leaders; significant performances by musicians, dancers and poets; interactions with working artists; lost documentaries; forgotten narrative films; and vintage discussions of important community issues.

All episodes can be viewed for free either live at URBAN-15 studio (2500 S. Presa 78210) or online at https://urban15.org/live-stream/

After each live screening, all episodes are archived online for 24/7 access at http://hiddenhistories.tv/archives

For more information on the series, visit http://hiddenhistories.tv